Subject Pronouns And Object Pronouns

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  • aqualine sapling style avatar for user maryinloveland


    What about sentences like, “It might be comfortable for you than for they to sit in the balcony.” Should it be they or them? How do you tell?

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    • aqualine tree style avatar for user David Alexander

      Great Answer

      Good Answer


      The sentence needs first to be rewritten. It is a comparative, so the word “more” needs to be inserted, as in: “It might be MORE comfortable for you than for them to sit in the balcony.”

      Then grammatically, we need to see the pronouns “you” and “them” as OBJECTS of the preposition, “FOR” that precedes them.

      Here’s the sentence, pulled apart:
      It (subject) might be (verb) more comfortable (predicate adjective) for you than for them to sit in the balcony (prepositional phrase, modifying something or other that came before).

  • cacteye green style avatar for user 🍀Gabe5.0🍀


    At

    , the sentence would be “She wrote an it”? That doesn’cakrawala make sense to me.

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    • aqualine tree style avatar for user David Alexander

      Good Answer


      Ah, Gabriel, things don’kaki langit have to make sense to you, or to me, for them to make sense. So, let’s have a little story.

      The first year students were writing words they learned.

      Jeremy wrote an “on”.

      Julie wrote an “in”.
      Then he wrote an “at”, and she wrote an “it.”

      How’s that?


  • primosaur ultimate style avatar for user Ansh


    Is objects just a category that Direct and Indirect Objects fit in?

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    • aqualine tree style avatar for user David Alexander

      Good Answer


      Using mathematical terms, “objects” is a set, of which “Direct objects” and “indirect objects” are subsets. There are also objects of prepositions, but that’s another story entirely.

  • aqualine ultimate style avatar for user evansstephen

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  • starky sapling style avatar for user KD M.


    So as you said ” they show him a guitar “. and you switch it to ” He showed them a guitar.” and you underline, he and them, wouldn’tepi langit you underline guitar as an object also sense you could hold it and see it?

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  • blobby green style avatar for user yashr2192


    In
    Reina wrote an email to Carl, are “email” and “Carl” both objects?


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    • blobby green style avatar for user m.harding


      Yes, we differentiate them as direct objects and indirect objects.

  • duskpin ultimate style avatar for user Rachel W


    Is the sentence “The email was written by her” grammatically correct?
    My understanding would be that as ‘her’ is the object pronoun (has stuff done to it), and the email is an objective clause (having stuff done to it), there is no subjective part to the sentence so it is incorrect?
    However it sounds correct to me.

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    • aqualine tree style avatar for user David Alexander


      The question here is about “active” and “passive” voice. Let’s look at it this way:
      Active voice: “She wrote the email.”
      Passive voice: “The email was written by her.”

      The explanation you offered may, indeed, have some merit, but it’s unnecessarily complex for something so simple.


  • aqualine ultimate style avatar for user Rajesh Yadavilli


    Does every sentence have a subject?

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    • aqualine ultimate style avatar for user alexandra skywalker


      Hi Rajesh! Yes, to be a complete thought, a sentence must have a subject. Here is an article about it. www.cabrillo.edu/~gjonker/Verbs%20revised.pdf

  • duskpin sapling style avatar for user GHOSTunderyourbedOFFICIAL


    SWITCHEROO. (pls ignore the switcheroo part)
    So THAT means, that the sub and the object always has to be an pronoun?…
    I mean it has to be person or animal, whit a name.
    Idk if I made it understand

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    • aqualine tree style avatar for user David Alexander


      NO. Subjects and objects are nouns, pronouns or noun phrases. This lesson merely shows you which of the pronouns are used as subjects, and differentiates them from the pronouns that are used as objects.

  • leafers sapling style avatar for user cmwu1007


    So “I,she,he” are subjects and “me,her,him” are objects?

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    • female robot amelia style avatar for user Johanna


      That’s correct.

      Here are some additional subjective pronouns: you, it, we, they.

      Here are some additional objective pronouns: you, it, us, them.


Video transcript

– [Voiceover] All right, so grammarians, I want to talk to you about the difference between subject and object pronouns, but before we do that, let’s start off with a little primer on what subjects and objects actually are, Just generally for our grammatical purposes. In grammar, the subject is the part of the sentence or clause that does a thing. The subject does a thing. The object, on the other hand, is the thing that is acted on, has stuff done to it, so the object has stuff done to it. The subject acts, the object is acted upon, let’s give an example. In the sentence, Reina wrote an e-mail, the subject of the sentence, the doer of the thing is Reina, right, as the subject. The thing she is doing is writing an e-mail, so Reina wrote an e-mail. E-mail is the object of the verb wrote. It is the object of the sentence. Now, there are cases when a sentence doesn’n have an object. For example, we could just say Reina wrote. It doesn’lengkung langit have an object, it’s just Reina’s the subject, and then there is no object. This is what we call intransitive usage, but you don’kaki langit need to write that down or anything. Now, understanding the relationship between e-mail and Reina enables you to understand how subject and object pronouns are used. When we’re subbing out these nouns for pronouns, we can figure out which ones we have to use, because pronouns have different forms depending on whether or not they are subjects or objects. Reina is a girl’s name, and if we know that Reina is a girl, we can refer to her as either she or her. These are two of the feminine pronouns. One of these is a subject, and one of them is an object. She is the subject form, and her is the object form. If we wanted to rewrite this sentence, speaking of Reina, we would say, she wrote an e-mail. Not, her wrote an e-mail, you see. Because her is the object pronoun, and therefore is the thing that, the object pronoun has stuff done to it, as opposed to the doer of things. She is the subject form, it’s the doer. For e-mail it’s easy, this just becomes it in all cases. The subject form, and the object form are the same. Let’s do a couple more examples just to shore this up so you see what I mean. I give her a present. Right now, I is the subject, her is the object. Subject, object, but what if we switched it? What would it look like then? Well it wouldn’t be her give I a present, because since we’re switching the subject and the object, we’re gonna be switching the pronouns that we use too, so it would be, she gave me a present. Now, she is the subject form of her, and me is the subject, is the object form, excuse berpenyakitan, derita is the object form of I. Get a little period in there. Same thing with they and he. They showed him a guitar. Why not? They is the subject, and him is the object. Let’s give it the old switcheroo. He showed them a guitar. Now, we do the switcheroo, him becomes he, so we go from the object form which is him to the subject from which is he, and then they, the subject form becomes them, the object form. Now when it comes to you and it, you’re in luck, because the subject and object forms of these are the same, so subject equals object, with you and it. I could say you give it a present just as easily as I could say it gives you a present. I didn’n realize I changed this to the past tense. She gives me a present. There we go, that’s better. That’s the difference between a subject and an object pronoun. You can learn anything. David out.

Source: https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/grammar/parts-of-speech-the-pronoun/subject-object-person-and-number/v/subject-and-object-pronouns-the-parts-of-speech-grammar

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